Date of release: Tuesday, December 4, 2018

A building described as the new heart of the Greenwich campus was officially opened at the University on Friday.

The Dreadnought building, bringing together all student facing services on the campus in one place for the first time, was opened by the university's Chancellor, Baroness Scotland PC QC.

Welcomed by Chair of the University's Governing Board, Marianne Ismail, guests were invited to tour the building's state-of-the-art facilities, which include:

  • Flexible, multi-purpose teaching spaces;
  • Open access IT labs and social learning spaces;
  • A home for the students' union and Student and Academic Services;
  • Radio Station and media suite;
  • Lower deck bar; and
  • Gym.

Speaking at Friday's event, Vice Chancellor of the University, Professor David Maguire, said: "Dreadnought is a great addition to our university. We wanted to create a space which provided a focal point for the campus. Dreadnought means 'fear nothing' and I think that's a good motto for our students and staff."

The building, which has been open for use for the last three months, is already proving popular with students.

President of Greenwich Students' Union, Meike Imberg, said: "Students love the spaces, they're already enjoying them. Thanks to all the many people who have brought this building to life – especially the students who are using it now."

Baroness Scotland added: "To be here tonight to see what the hopes and aspirations for this space have delivered is extraordinary. In the last five years this university has blossomed. The impact of the university on our students has been profound and that makes me proud to be chancellor.

"This is a transformation – not just of this building but it enables our students to be transformed too. You have sown a seed here which will flourish for current students and all students who follow them."

The building's ground floor café is open to the public. Drop in and see the Dreadnought chair (made from the original early 19th century Dreadnought ship) or to find out more about the fascinating history of the Dreadnought building.