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Forthcoming Events

Forthcoming Events

COP26 Fixing the unsustainable: problems, solutions, alternatives

Next month, COP26 will bring the world's governments together to discuss the actions necessary to tackle the climate emergency for the 26th time.

The Institute of Political Economy, Governance, Finance and Accountability (PEGFA), in collaboration with other organisations, are hosting a series of hybrid events on how to rapidly decarbonise and radically reform our economic system. The series of events will analyse every dimension of our economic system, from fiscal and monetary policy to shortening the working week.

Many of these events are "hybrid” event that you can attend in person on the university campus, or online. For those attending online, a Microsoft Teams link will be sent to the email address you sign up with the day before the event. For those attending in person, the events will be hosted in: Room HH103, Hamilton House, University of Greenwich 15 Park Vista, London, England, SE10 9LZ.

Summary:

October 7: Is the Silvertown Tunnel, a four-lane road tunnel across the Thames, compatible with London's climate commitments Register

Nov 4: Decarbonising the Bank of England's monetary policy, UoG-NEF-SOAS-UWE joint event Register

Nov 17: Global Finance, Governance and Socio-Ecological Transformation.: Insights for Progressive Strategies from the Special Issue and a COP26 debrief - what has been achieved? Register

Dec 2: The scope of fiscal policy to tackle climate change Register

Jan TBA: The unsustainability of intersectional division of labour: aspects of class, race, sex, and gender

Feb TBA: The roles of standards for trade in changing the (economic) environment

Feb TBA: Sustainable future of transport and transit

March TBA: A shorter working week for a gender-equal green transition

April TBA: Sustainability in British SMEs in the aftermath of Covid19 and Brexit: Has COP26 meant anything?


Nov 4: Decarbonising the Bank of England's monetary policy

The aim of the event is to discuss how the Bank of England can decarbonise its monetary policy under its new climate neutrality mandate. A new UoG, New Economics Foundation, SOAS, and UWE report will be presented which focuses on alternative approaches for greening the Corporate Bonds Purchase Scheme.

More details about this event will be announced on our website. This event will be online and registration is open and free.

Date: Thurs, 4 November 2021

Time: 17:30 – 19:30 BST

Location: This event will be online.

Sign up link: This event is free but please register using this link


Nov 17: Global Finance, Governance and Socio-Ecological Transformation: Insights for Progressive Strategies from the Special Issue and a COP26 debrief - what has been achieved?

Green finance has been increasingly presented as being an effective solution to global environmental problems and climate change.  However, today’s global financial structures tend to reproduce global inequalities and contribute to continued, highly unequal over-use and destruction of the environment, as well as a global ecological crisis.

Fossil fuel dependent world economy needs to rapidly decarbonise and that needs to be adequately financed and equally adequately governed and managed. The above begs questions about the sources of funding, targets of it, modes of governance and ownership of productive and reproductive systems that are to emerge, replace what is clearly not working, what is driving the global heating.

This workshop will (1) build on the scholarship collated in the Special Issue “The Global Political Economy of Green Finance and Socio-Ecological Transformation”, in Das Journal für Entwicklungspolitik (2021) Jaeger, J. and L. Schmidt, Eds. and (2) aim to assess the progress/regress of the COP26 and what it means for the problematic raised in the SI.

Speakers

Dr Yuliya Yurchenko, Senior Lecturer in Political Economy

Professor Johannes Jaeger, Professor and Economics coordinator at the University of Applied Sciences BFI Vienna

Plus more speakers TBA

Date: 17 November 2021

Time: 17:30 – 19:30 BST

Location: Room HH103, Hamilton House, University of Greenwich, 15 Park Vista, SE10 9LZ

Sign up link: This event is free but please register using this link


Nov 18: Time to remit: The effect of remittances on household consumption in India. A panel analysis of the India Human Development Survey.

India has enjoyed over twenty years of rapid economic growth. The benefits of this growth, however, have largely by-passed India's poor: around a quarter of the world's malnourished children lives in India, and their wasted bodies and stunted lives represent a challenge for the Indian government. Although the growth in India's domestic economy did not result in many trickle-down benefits for the hungry poor, anecdotal evidence suggests that food security has benefited from another factor. Both rural or urban families have become increasingly reliant on remittances and used them to improve their food security. This paper explores the pattern of relationship between remittances received and food consumption at the household level; the paper uses a panel data approach with data coming from two rounds of the ‘India Human Development Survey’ (IHDS) conducted in 2005 and in 2011-12, and employs an instrumental variable approach to control for the endogeneity of remittances. The econometric results indicate that remittances do have a significant positive effect on the size of expenditure on food, as well as on two key indicators of food diversity, the Shannon and the Simpson Index. Results are robust to models’ specification and support the view that remittances do represent a mechanism by which households improve their food security.

Speakers

Dr Luca Tasciotti, Senior Lecturer in Economics

Dr Navjot Sangwan, Senior Lecturer in Economics

Time: 17:30 – 19:30 BST

Location: Room QA063, Queen Anne Building, Old Royal Naval College, Park Row, London SE10 9LS


Dec 2: The scope of fiscal policy to tackle climate change

How will we pay for the green new deal? This workshop will debate how to conduct truly sustainable fiscal policy and public investment.

Speakers

Dr Cem Oyvat, Senior Lecturer in economics at the University of Greenwich

Dr Rafael Wildauer, Senior Lecturer in economics at the University of Greenwich

Plus more speakers TBA

More details about this event will be announced on our website. Registration is open and free

Date: 2 December 2021

Time: 17:30 – 19:30 BST

Location: Room HH103, Hamilton House, University of Greenwich, 15 Park Vista, SE10 9LZ

Sign up link: This event is free but please register using this link


Jan TBA: The unsustainability of the intersectional division of labour: aspects of class, race, sex, and gender

The exploitation of the ecological system is just one part of the general exploitative nature of our global capitalist system. This workshop will analyse the relationship between class, race, sex and gender and the destruction of the plane by ecocidal productivist economic doctrines.

Speakers

Dr Lucia Pradella, Senior Lecturer in International Political Economy at King's College London

Dr Yuliya Yurchenko, Senior Lecturer in Political Economy at the University of Greenwich

Plus more speakers TBA

More details about this event will be announced on our website. Registration is open and free

Location: Room HH103, Hamilton House, University of Greenwich, 15 Park Vista, SE10 9LZ


Feb TBA: The roles of standards for trade in changing the (economic) environment

The number of plant and animal species under threat of extinction our current geological epoch is unprecedented. Environmental standards have been promoted as a policy guideline that can effectively regulate the effect of human activity on the environment. In an ever-interconnected world, environmental standards have multiple effects which affect trade patterns, environmental protection, poverty, economic development and employment across countries. This talk with economists, social scientists and environmental activists links environmental standards for trade with several issues that have recently received attention: environmental protection and conservation, trade, corruption, environmental justice and human rights.

Speakers

Dr. Elissaios Papyrakis, Senior Lecturer in Development Economics (Macroeconomics) at the Institute of Social Studies of the Erasmus University Rotterdam

Prof. Lorenzo Pellegrini, Associate Professor of Economics of Environment and Development at the International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam

Dr. Luca Tasciotti, Senior Lecturer in Economics at the University of Greenwich
Plus more to be announced

More details about this event will be announced on our website. Registration is open and free

Location: Room HH103, Hamilton House, University of Greenwich, 15 Park Vista, SE10 9LZ


Feb TBA: Sustainable future of transport and transit

Speakers

Dr Alistair Bogaars is a Lecturer in the Department of Systems Management and Strategy (CCRG/NUSC)

Plus more speakers to be announced soon

More details about this event will be announced on our website. Registration will open in the new year.


March 10: A shorter working week for a gender-equal green transition

The workshop will present findings from a report from the University of Greenwich and the Women’s Budget Group.

Speakers

Prof Ozlem Onaran, co-director of PEGFA and professor of economics at the University of Greenwich

Dr Robert Calvert Jump, research fellow at the University of Greenwich

Time: 17:30 – 19:30 BST

Location: Room QA080, Queen Anne Building, Old Royal Naval College, Park Row, London SE10 9LS

More details about this event will be announced on our website. Registration will open in the new year.


April TBA: Sustainability in British SMEs in the aftermath of Covid19 and Brexit: Has COP26 meant anything?


More details about this event will be announced on our website. Registration will open in the new year.


April 22: London Political Economy Meeting


More details about this event will be announced on our website. Registration will open in the new year.

Location: Room HH103, Hamilton House, University of Greenwich, 15 Park Vista, SE10 9LZ


Past Events

Online Conference: Inequalities and policy implications after Covid-19

Whether we look at wealth, race, gender, health, or income, the pandemic has exposed, and in some cases exacerbated, pre-existing inequalities. From Black Lives Matter to new wealth taxes, the visibility of inequality has generated a strong response from social movements and policy makers. This raises many questions that have long been at the heart of policy - what causes inequality? What policies stop it rising? And does it ultimately lead to instability?

Programme

12:30 Opening remarks: Vice Chancellor Professor Jane Harrington, University of Greenwich (UoG)

12:45 Keynote speech 1

Chair: Ozlem Onaran, Professor of Economics, Co-director of PEGFA, UoG

Transformatory strategies to reduce inequalities after Covid-19: creating caring economies, Diane Elson, Emeritus Professor University of Essex,

13:15 Tackling wealth inequalities

Chair: Aleksandar Stojanovic, Professor and HoD of Accounting and Finance, Co-director of PEGFA

Tax wealth to fund purple and green public investment, Ozlem Onaran, Professor of Economics, Co-director of PEGFA

The fall and rise of the top 1%: is wealth inequality determined by new technologies, globalisation, progressive taxation, or worker’s bargaining power? Ben Tippet, PhD Research Student, UoG,

The distribution of wealth in Europe and a European wealth tax, Rafael Wildauer, Senior Lecturer in Economics, UoG

Producer cooperatives as pre-distribution: Lessons from Emilia Romagna, Adotey Bing-Pappoe, Senior Lecturer in Economics, UoG

15:00 Keynote speech 2

Chair: Jeff Powell, Programme Leader UG Economics, UoG

Informality and intersectionality of race, gender and class inequality: The impact of Covid-19 policy responses in developing countries, Jayati Ghosh, Professor of Economics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

15:30 Race, gender, class inequalities and development

Chair: Julia Mundy, Deputy director of PEGFA, UoG

The Effects of Public Social Infrastructure and Gender Equality on Output and Employment: The case of South Korea, Cem Oyvat, Senior Lecturer in Economics , UoG

Neoliberal de-development and social reproduction in the post-Soviet space: erosion of women’s rights, social protection and security in Ukraine, Yuliya Yurchenko, Senior Lecturer in Political Economy, UoG

Capitalism, labour and race: the role of accounting in the Indian Maritime labourers, Antonella Russo, Senior Lecturer in Financial Accounting, UoG

The impact of Global Value Chain participation on income inequality in Emerging Economies, Alexander Guschanski, Lecturer in Economics, UoG

17:15 Finance, regional development and inequalities

Chair: Maria Nikolaidi, Assoc. Prof., UoG

Estimating workforce jobs data for British local authority districts, 1981-2018, Rob Calvert Jump, Research Fellow in Economics, PEGFA, UoG

Unconventional monetary policy and inequality, Alberto Botta (Programme Leader MSc Economics, UoG), Eugenio Caverzasi (Università Politecnica delle Marche), Alberto Russo(Università Politecnica delle Marche), Mauro Gallegati (Università Politecnica delle Marche), Joseph Stiglitz (Columbia University)

Inequalities in accessing finance: Has government support equipped British credit union sector to meet post Covid challenges? Sallyanne Decker, Principal Lecturer in Banking and Finance, UoG

Bank Credit Risk and Macro-Prudential Policies: Role of Liquidity in Uncertain times, Nadia Benbouzid (Senior Lecturer, UoG), Abishek Kumar, Sushanta Mallick (Professor of International Finance, Queen Mary), Ricardo Sousa (Associate Professor in Economics, University of Minho), Aleksandar Stojanovic (Professor, Head of Accounting and Finance, Finance, Co-director of PEGFA)

Tuesday 23 March 2021 12:30-18:45 (GMT)


Research Webinar: A dataset of workforce job counts for British local authority districts, 1981-2018

Speaker
Dr Rob Calvert Jump

Abstract
This paper presents workforce job counts for British local authority districts between the years 1981 and 2018. The estimates are produced by adjusting local authority job counts drawn from the Census of Employment, Annual Employment Survey, Annual Business Inquiry, and Business Register and Employment Survey to match regional job counts drawn from the Workforce Jobs dataset. The result is a measure of sub-regional workforce jobs which is consistent with publicly available national statistics, and can be motivated as a maximum entropy estimator. To illustrate the use of the dataset, the employment effects of European Union Objective 1 funding are examined using a synthetic control method.

Wednesday 3rd February 14:00-16:00 (GMT)
Click here to join the seminar (No sign up needed)


Research Webinar: Central Bank Power versus the tyranny of financial markets: liquidity preference in a world of endogenous money

Speakers
Dr Alberto Botta and Professor Marco Missaglia

Abstract
In this paper we present a simple Keynesian model about the role of liquidity preference in the determination of economic performance. We assume a world of endogenous money, where the banking system is able to fix the interest rate at a level of its own willing. Even in this framework, we show that the Keynesian theory of liquidity preference, while obviously not constituting anymore a theory for the determination of the interest rate, continues to be a fundamental piece of theory for the determination of the level and evolution of aggregate income over time, both in the short and in the medium run. However powerful, the banking system and monetary authorities are not the deus ex machina of our economies and financial markets are likely to exert a permanent influence on our economic destiny.

Tuesday 9th February  14:00-16:00 (GMT)
Click here to join the meeting (no sign up needed)


Research Webinar: Does intellectual property protection deliver economic benefits? A multi-outcome meta-regression analysis of the evidence

Speaker
Professor Mehmet Ugur

Abstract
Both theoretical and empirical research on intellectual property protection (IPP) report contingent and conflicting findings on how IPP affects related outcomes such as innovation, technology diffusion, productivity, or growth. To establish where the balance of the evidence lies and identify the sources of heterogeneity in the evidence base, we conduct a multi-outcome meta-regression analysis that takes account of dependence, unobserved heterogeneity, and publication selection at the same time. Drawing on 91 primary studies that report 1,626 effect-size estimates for one or more outcomes, we find that IPP does not spur innovation, technology diffusion, productivity, or economic growth. The effects remain statistically or practically insignificant under different scenarios concerning model specification, effect-size standardisation, and ‘best practice’ scenarios for research. Our work offers two contributions to existing knowledge: (i) we extend the application of the multi-outcome meta-regression analysis into evidence synthesis in economics; and (ii) we provide verifiable/replicable evidence indicating that the sanguine claims about the IPP’s economic benefits encountered in some legal studies and the advocacy literature are misleading.

Tuesday 16th February 14:00 – 16:00 (GMT)
Click here to join the meeting (no sign in required)


Webinar: A Sub-national Resource Curse? A synthetic-control approach to the case of hydrocarbons in Basilicata, Italy

Speaker

Dr Luca Tasciotti

Abstract

Basilicata is a region of Southern Italy where the expansion of oil operations in the 1990s was promoted as an opportunity to foster economic development. In 2020, Basilicata is one of the poorest regions in Europe despite the exploitation of the largest onshore hydrocarbon reserves of the continent. The coincidence of high poverty rates with abundant natural resources suggests that the region is experiencing a 'resource curse'; however, socio-economic problems predate the oil boom, complicating any causality claim. To disentangle and estimate the effects of oil exploitation, we employ the synthetic control method that compares the actual trends of development indicators of Basilicata with a counterfactual that is created by taking a weighted average of trends of other Italian regions --a 'synthetic' Basilicata.

The analysis finds that the development of oil operations has generated no detectable improvement to employment, nor to a range of social indicators, nor educational attainment. The absence of quantifiable beneficial effects is coupled with negative impacts on other dimensions of development that are more difficult to estimate --the environment and human health. Taken together the evidence offers a sobering prospect over the potential of resource-based development for disadvantaged regions in developed countries.

Time: 26th January, 4pm
Sign up link to be uploaded soon


Webinar: 3000 Years of Discrimination and Counting: How Caste Still Matters in the Indian Credit Sector

Speaker
Dr Navjot Sangwan

Abstract
The caste system has dominated the social, political and economic lives of Indian people for over three thousand years. Since independence, the Indian government has introduced a flood of quotas, schemes and affirmative action to tackle caste discrimination. Can seventy years of government policy reverse three thousand years of oppression? Taking a close look at the country's credit system reveals that a new, more subtle, and less overt form of discrimination appears to be emerging, and becoming more widespread. This paper examines whether caste-based differences influence the amount of credit sanctioned to borrowers in India utilising data from the India Human Development Survey collected in 2005 and 2011-12. Using the Blinder–Oaxaca decomposition method, along with the Heckman procedure and the instrumental variable approach to correct for selection and simultaneity bias, I find substantial credit differentials between the general caste and other lower castes. I also show evidence of caste discrimination against the lower castes. The results of this research have been complemented by qualitative data gathered from interviewing lower caste borrowers in North India to understand the nature of discrimination and obstacles faced by them in the credit sector.

Time: Tuesday 8th December, 3.30pm
Click here to join the meeting [no need to sign up]
Working paper: PDF
Further details: here


Webinar: COVID-19, ecological, economic, social and financial sustainability

The scale of the COVID-19 crisis and its economic impact is unprecedented. Yet, even before the public health crisis struck, there were serious questions about the ecological, financial and social sustainability of our economy.

As economists from the Greenwich Political Economy Research Centre and the Institute of Political Economy, Governance, Finance and Accountability (PEGFA), we are hosting a series of webinars exploring the economic challenges of our time: from COVID-19 to the ecological, financial and social sustainability of modern capitalism.

Every Thursday at 3pm, a leading researcher from our research centre will run a free online seminar on their area of expertise, to help us make sense of these tumultuous times.

May 21: Fighting the COVID-19 emergency and relaunching the European economy: debt monetization and recovery bonds. Presentation slides | Video

May 28: Investing in social infrastructure and equality: lessons for macroeconomic policy from the pandemic Presentation slides | Video

June 4: COVID-19 and the public finances: Another ten years of austerity? Presentation slides |  Video

June 11: Class in the time of COVID-19: how the crisis has exposed class divides Presentation slides | Video

June 18: Greening the Bank of England COVID-19 QE programme Presentation slides | Video

June 22: Cooperatives: democracy, equality, and efficiency

July 2: Reflections on innovation policy after Covid-19: What does the microeconometric evidence tell us? Presentation slides

July 9: The political economy of income distribution – why is income inequality increasing and what can we do about it? Presentation slides | Video

July 14: Is the European Green Deal ambitious enough? Presentation slides | Video

In relation to the European Green Deal, please find two recent papers connected to European energy policy from GPERC academic Dr Yuliya Yurchenko Paper 1 | Paper 2

To see a more information on each event and to register please follow the link here.

Download Full Programme here.


Past Events

Click here to see past events.

News

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