Jean Wilke

Jean Wilke BA, LLB, LLM, LTCL

Lecturer in Law

Jean Wilke joined the School of Law and Criminology in 2021.  Jean holds Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws from the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa.  In 2010, Jean was awarded a Rotary Ambassadorial Scholarship to study her Master of Laws at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand.

Jean has previously worked at the Constitutional Court of South Africa where she clerked for Chief Justice Sandile Ngcobo.  Jean has also worked as the Legal Advisor for the Western Cape Provincial Parliament.

In 2012, Jean was admitted as an Advocate of the High Court of South Africa.  In 2014, she was called to the Cape Bar where she completed her pupillage and became an Associate Academic member.

Jean has always had an interest in the legal academic field.  Prior to joining the University of Greenwich, Jean was a Lecturer in the Law Faculty at the University of Cape Town.

Law

Responsibilities within the university

Lecturer for undergraduate law modules

Recognition

Advocate of the High Court of South Africa

Research / Scholarly interests

Jean’s research interests include International Human Rights Law, Constitutional Law, the Law of Succession and Family Law

Recent publications

Journal Articles
  • Wilke, J. and Osman, F. (2018) ‘Dress Codes in Schools: A Tale of Headscarves and Hairstyles’. Obiter, 39(3), pp. 585-603
  • Wilke, J. (2013) ‘The right to privacy and drug-testing in sport in South Africa: Could the New Zealand case of Cropp v Judicial Committee provide some guidance?’. Obiter, 34(1), pp. 49-63
Book Note

Wilke, J. (2019), ‘Book Note: HonorĂ©’s South African Law of Trusts, Edwin Cameron, Marius de Waal & Peter Solomon’, SALJ, Volume 136(2), p. 394-396

Presentations

Wilke, J. (2012) ‘The Right to Privacy and Drug-Testing in Sport in South Africa: Can an Infringement and a Limitation of the Right be Reasonable and Justified?’ South African Institute for Drug-Free Sport and The Institute of Development and Labour Law (UCT) Colloquium, 2 July, Bloemfontein