Dissertation

Module summary

Module code: BUSI1440
Level: 7
Credits: 45
School: Business Faculty
Department: Marketing, Events and Tourism
Module Coordinator(s): Klairoong Phairor

Specification

Aims

The dissertation is a key element of the MA degree. It is the point where knowledge and understanding acquired through the earlier taught modules is synthesised and applied to a substantial management problem. Students reaching this level of study will have successfully completed a range of taught modules, including research methods. This module is designed to build on that knowledge and provide a supported learning environment in which students can plan a more thorough research enquiry of their own choosing. The key outcome of the module is the report of an investigation into an issue of importance. The dissertation is expected to draw on relevant theoretical literature as well as independent empirical research.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student will be able to:
1 Plan and complete a dissertation over an extended time period and meeting a deadline.
2 Formulate research questions or hypotheses.
3 Design an appropriate method of data collection.
4 Gather data through a variety of research methods
5 Analyse, interpret and draw conclusions from data gathered and literature surveyed.
6 Structure and write up a dissertation effectively, thinking critically and writing with accuracy and style

Indicative content

Self-directed-research on a topic agreed with and guided by a Supervisor.

Teaching and learning activity

There is no teaching on this course. Students are required and expected to meet their supervisors on a regular basis to discuss the progress of dissertation at various stages.

Assessment

Dissertation - 100%
LO - 1-6
Pass Mark - 50%
15000 words.
The dissertation will normally build on work already undertaken in the Research Methods module.

Nature of FORMATIVE assessment supporting student learning:
An Ethical Compliance Form to be submitted before students embarked on their primary research.