SHIFT, 11-12 January 2022

Learn more about our annual learning, teaching and assessment conference taking place on 11-12 January 2022.

This year’s conference draws together four very topical strands that will give educators and students alike an opportunity to showcase their innovative approaches to learning and teaching over the past year.

Update: The Call for Papers has been extended. Submit your proposal by 3 November 2021.

About Shift

Our annual conference of Learning and Teaching is now into its 15th year. As ever, the title of our conference series – SHIFT – reflects the changing HE landscape. This year’s conference draws together four very topical strands that will give educators and students alike an opportunity to showcase their innovative approaches to learning and teaching over the past year.

SHIFT2022 will be facilitated for both online as well as on-site participation.

Learning and teaching has had to change during the past year or so and it is important to recognise that some of those changes have been positive and will remain and continue to be developed. The inclusive curriculum is important as ever in HE, but do we know it when we see it, and what does, or can it look like? Developing sustainable learning and teaching is more important than ever as students will face new challenges in employment, a strand that is closely linked to co-creating HE, highlighting how students are involved in designing their own learning and teaching.

Meet our keynote speakers

Professor Alison Cook-Sather (Bryn Mawr College, USA)
Expanding Possibilities: The Potential of Cross-Context and Cross-Role Partnerships in Co-creating Higher Education

Alison Cook-Sather is Mary Katharine Woodworth Professor of Education at Bryn Mawr College and Director of the Teaching and Learning Institute at Bryn Mawr and Haverford Colleges. Dr. Cook-Sather has developed internationally recognized programs that position students as pedagogical consultants to prospective secondary teachers and to practicing college faculty members. She has published over 100 articles and book chapters and given as many keynotes, other invited presentations, and papers at refereed conferences on six continents. Author or co-author of eight books, includingPedagogical Partnerships: A How-To Guide for Faculty, Students, and Academic Developers in Higher Education (with Melanie Bahti and Anita Ntem, Elon University Center for Engaged Learning Open Access Series, 2019) and Promoting Equity and Justice through Pedagogical Partnership (with Alise de Bie, Elizabeth Marquis, and Leslie Patricia Luqueño, Stylus Publishers, 2021), she is founding editor of Teaching and Learning Together in Higher Education and founding co-editor of International Journal for Students as Partners.

Dr Yang Hu (Lancaster University, UK)
COVID-19, Social Inequalities and Well-being—Mapping the Margins

Yang Hu is a Senior Lecturer in Sociology, Lancaster University, UK. He is also the deputy lead of 'Data in Society' at Lancaster's Data Science Institute. Yang obtained his PhD in Sociology as a Gates Scholar from the University of Cambridge, and he was an early career fellow at the Work-Family Researchers Network, USA. Yang's research focuses on changing work-family, intimate and gender relations, as well as their intersections with population mobility, in a global context. He is an editorial board member of the Journal of Marriage and Family, Sociology, and Sociology Compass. Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, he has conducted research on the implications of the pandemic for social inequalities and people’s well-being in a cross-national comparative context. Twitter: @dr_yanghu

Conference Themes

Led by a committee with representation from the different faculties and directorates of the University of Greenwich, as well as from Greenwich Students' Union, the conference will address the following themes through its keynote presentations and parallel sessions; as ever, underpinned by practices that lead to improving teaching, learning and assessment outcomes:

Lessons Learned from Blended Years

A key aspect of the past two years has been the limited access to physical learning environments combined with a greater reliance on broadband connectivity. For both learners as well as educators, the blended learning environment has been one of experimenting with digital learning technologies. SHIFT2022 wants to be a reflection point as our communities come out of the COVID19 pandemic. We welcome contributions that take pause at this crossroads to create insight that may guide us onwards.

This track welcomes various dimensions of HE, for example: What has changed in HE in the past one or two years (such as online learning), how will educators go forward in terms of making changes or adapting teaching practice? What problems has the blended learning environment made us aware of (such as digital poverty), how can educators minimize or compensate for these problems?  What does authentic and compassionate assessment mean in a post-pandemic HE? What is that ‘real’ world of work it should relate to?  What are appropriate quality and extenuating circumstances criteria, considering the challenging times our students face, both financially and otherwise? How can we adjust student retention policies?

Recognising the Inclusive Curriculum

Following the increased explicit attention for inclusive curricula, specific frameworks and tools are developed to assist in the design and delivery of diverse learning in terms of student disability, age, prior learning, learning styles, learning preferences, native language, race, and ethnicity. Does this require educators to introduce new content and new methods? Or is some of what we do already excellent practice under another name?

At SHIFT2022, we welcome contributions to the Inclusive Curriculum in a broad sense. Examples can include strategic work on BAME Awarding gap and embedding wellbeing in the curriculum. We are particularly keen to explore what of our ‘old’ practices we keep and which we renew. Hence a question driving this track can be: inclusive curriculum, what is it/does it look like/can it look like/do we know it when we see it?

How does critical pedagogy allow us to address unique needs of BAME students, students with disability, or digital poverty? What is a compassionate curriculum and how does a humanist approach prepare us for the post-pandemic escalation of mental health and wellbeing issues? How do the Universal Design Principles (UDP) of accessibility, usability and inclusivity minimise the need for specialised design and accommodations to cater to students’ unique needs? What are different ways to put these principles into practice?

Sustainable Development in Learning and Teaching

HE has a crucial role in helping solve many of the challenges our societies and natural systems face. Environmental and social sustainability has relevance to every area of our teaching. The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) help us to look at what we teach through the ‘lens’ of sustainability, connecting to the world around us and the issues that need to be considered, understood and solved. What currently happens under the umbrella Education for Sustainable Development/Futures (ESD/ESF) is incredibly buzzing, for example the many case studies of how HEIs engage with social justice, climate change or circular economy. Recognising there is not a ‘one size fits all’ approach to integrating sustainability into our learning and teaching, SHIFT2022 wants to explore how HE can be transformative communities for sustainable development.

Considerations include but are not limited to: How are critical thinking, systems thinking and anticipatory competency skills for sustainable development?  How does the curriculum develop competencies and motivation to pursue visions of the future?  How is Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) creating a transformative experience for students?  How is the curriculum avoiding merely adding ESD content, and instead focusing on aligning other learning outcomes and content to assist ESD?  How can ESD be assessed?

Co-Creating Higher Education

Scholars and practitioners widely recognise co-creation of teaching and learning in Higher Education as a powerful approach. Studies commonly refer to students as partners as they adopt active and participatory roles and work collaboratively with educators in a process known as value co-creation. However, most of the scholarly efforts focus on the needs and expectations for value co-creation with respect to a single category of stakeholders, namely students, who are often considered as the primary recipients of the services provided by Higher Education Institutions (HEI). Acknowledging the important role of students as partners, there are however, several other stakeholders that appear to be promising and resourceful HEI partners. For example, working with different stakeholders, including but not limited to, Transnational education (TNE) partners, local SMEs, alumni, employers and public sector organisations, offer new avenues to leverage co-creative approaches to teaching and learning.

At SHIFT2022, we want to consider co-creative approaches to teaching and learning, involving a variety of stakeholders, as a unique opportunity to unlock HEI’s full potential benefitting students, staff, HEI, and wider society. To discuss this theme and reveal the diverse nature and application domains of such collaborative approaches, we welcome contributions from scholars and practitioners from across all disciplines to our SHIFT 2022 conference. We invite qualitative, quantitative and conceptual papers that focus on co-creation approaches to teaching and learning.

Proposal Formats

Download the Call for Papers SHIFT 2022

We invite scholars and practitioners to submit proposals aligned to the conference sub-themes and in the following three formats:

Research Results Presentation

A traditional conference presentation of up to 15 minutes, followed by a 5 minutes question and answer session moderated by the session chair. This format is suitable for both scholars and practitioners that would like to share insights from their research or practice. Research Results Presentations are based on completed research/projects or on-going work that has already produced significant results the presenter is able to share.

When considering the preferred format for your contribution to SHIFT, please keep in mind the following criteria for Research Results Presentations:

  • Proposals should relate to research/scholarship/practice relevant to the conference sub-themes.
  • This format is suited to completed research/projects or ongoing work with a substantial amount of findings where you can explore the analysis and outcomes.
  • Strong proposals will demonstrate engagement with appropriate literature and/ or scholarship, and include between 5 and 10 references (Harvard referencing style).
  • Strong proposals will be evidence-informed.
  • Papers produced in partnership (student-staff/academic-professional/university-external organisation) are encouraged.
  • Presenters will be asked to provide their presentation in advance of the conference.
  • Proposals should be between 750 and 1,000 words long (references excluded).

Project-in-Progress Presentation

A shorter presentation that allows scholars and practitioners to share their on-going work in up to 10 minutes, followed by 10 minutes discussion moderated by a session chair. The focus of the Project-in-Progress presentations is the developmental aspect and feedback. Therefore, presenters introduce their topic which then serves as a basis for discussion and feedback from the audience. The last slide should include areas for feedback & development.

When considering the preferred format for your contribution to SHIFT, please keep in mind the following criteria for Project-in-Progress Presentations:

  • Proposals should relate to research/scholarship/practice relevant to the conference sub-themes.
  • This format is suited to early stage research/projects for which discussions would be beneficial to presenter and delegates.
  • Strong proposals will demonstrate engagement with appropriate literature and/ or scholarship. Including references in the proposal is encouraged (Harvard referencing style).
  • Proposals produced in partnership (student-staff/academic-professional/university-external organisation) are encouraged.
  • Presenters will be asked to provide their presentation in advance of the conference and include a slide on the areas for feedback and development.
  • Proposals should be between 500 and 750 words long (references excluded).

Workshop

The workshop format should be designed as an interactive session for participants to explore a topic related to the conference themes in more details by engaging directly with other participants. Whilst the workshop may include some content delivery, this should be minimal – no longer than 15 minutes in total – with the focus on providing space to explore the topic in a deeper way, benefitting from the sharing of perspectives and experiences with other delegates. This format can also be used to experiment with innovative teaching practices aligned with the conference themes.

When considering the preferred format for your contribution to SHIFT, please keep in mind the following criteria for the workshop format:

  • Proposals should relate to at least one of the conference sub-themes and highlight practical learning outcomes for workshop participants.
  • Workshop facilitators may utilise their own practice, research or scholarship as a basis for the workshop.
  • Strong proposals will demonstrate engagement with appropriate literature and/or scholarship. Including references in the proposal is encouraged (Harvard referencing style).
  • The workshop proposal should include plans for 40 minutes of active delegate engagement/discussion. The proposal should outline how active engagement will be achieved (e.g. through tools, practices).
  • Proposals should be between 500 and 750 words long (references excluded).

Proposal Submission

We invite contributions from practitioners, professional services staff, academic staff and students. Co-authored presentations with students are particularly encouraged. We also welcome presentations about ongoing projects at any stage of their development. We invite all presenters to make their presentations as interactive and engaging as possible. The adoption of interactive tools and practices as part of the presentations is encouraged.

If you require any additional guidance or support during the submission process, please get in touch with shift@gre.ac.uk.

Proposals will be submitted electronically using this form; Please submit the complete proposal by 22 October 2021.

Download the Call for Papers SHIFT 2022

Review process and dissemination routes

All submissions will be blind peer-reviewed, and authors will receive feedback and be provided the opportunity to resubmit if required. All proposals will be made available to delegates and selected ones will be encouraged to contribute a full paper to Compass: Journal of Learning and Teaching. All accepted proposals are invited to be submitted as a blog (1000-1500 words) (For an example, see the L&T Festival blogs). More information on the blog submissions will follow after the proposal review process.

Key Dates for SHIFT 2022

Submissions openMonday 13 September 2021 
Delegate registration opensMonday 13 September 2021
Proposal submission deadline  Friday 22 October 2021 
Extended: Wednesday 3 November  2021
Authors receive feedback on proposals Friday 19 November 2021 
Re-submissions deadline Friday 26 November 2021 

Delegate registration closes

Friday 10 December 2021 
Publication of full conference programme Friday 17 December 2021 
Submission of presentations Wednesday 5 January 2022 

Conference (Online)

Tuesday 11 January 2022
Wednesday 12 January 2022

Delegate Registration is now Open

You can now register via this form, registrations will close on Friday 10th December

Programme

The conference programme will be published here in December 2021.

If you have any queries, please contact shift@gre.ac.uk.

SHIFT 2022 Organising Committee

Louise Hewitt (Co-Chair, Faculty of Liberal Arts & Sciences)
Wim Vandekerckhove (Co-Chair, Faculty of Business)

Ciprian Alupei (Academic and Learning Enhancement)
Tom Bacon (PR & Communications)
Nele Leitolf (Greenwich Students' Union) 
Ozgur Cinar (Faculty of Liberal Arts & Sciences)
Alison Cork (Faculty of Education, Health and Human Sciences)
Anna Costantino (Faculty of Liberal Arts & Sciences)
Marianna Ercolino (Faculty of Engineering & Science)
Katharina Greve (Faculty of Business)
Leroi Henry (Faculty of Business)
Julie Mundair (Academic Skills/Faculty of Business)
Laxmi Pant (Faculty of Engineering & Science)
Abigail Rickard (Faculty of Engineering & Science)
Ros Smith (Library/Information and Library Services)
Jenny Spinks (Academic Skills/Information and Library Services)
Ian Tharp (Faculty of Education, Health and Human Sciences)
Tony Wright  (IT/Information and Library Services)

Further Information:

Contact: shift@gre.ac.uk

Privacy Notice

When you book this conference we process information about who you are and your contact details; information that you provide on adjustments that may need to be made to enable you to attend and your dietary requirements. This information will be used by relevant University of Greenwich employees to manage your attendance and participation at SHIFT 2022 and enable you to provide your feedback afterwards. The data that you provide will be held for a period of 5 years and will not be shared with third parties. General information about the university's approach to data protection and to your rights can be found here.