Research activities

GPERC | Past Events

Greenwich Political Economy Research Centre hosts many conferences, seminars and events. Find out more about some of our past events below.

2022

April 5: Defence Acquisition and Procurement: How (not) to buy weapons.

Professor Ron Smith will present a paper on defence economics for students and staff at the University of Greenwich, and interested members of the public.

Speakers

Professor Ron Smith, Professor of Applied Economics, Department of Economics, Mathematics and Statistics, Birkbeck, University of London

Chair: Dr Robert Calvert Jump, research fellow at the University of Greenwich

Time: 16:00 – 17:30 GMT

Location: Room QA075, Queen Anne Building, University of Greenwich. This is a hybrid event and will also be accessible via Microsoft Teams.


April 6: Financing sustainability in the SMEs of the UK after Brexit, Covid-19 and COP 26: The road ahead

After Brexit, Covid-19 placed an unexpected burden on this already battered sector. However, according to the government’s post Pandemic policies, half of the UK's Medium-Sized and Small businesses (SMEs) anticipate a rise in income and demand on 2022; In fact, official sources gather that SMEs feel borrowing will be important to their growth and recovery. Equally relevant, SMEs account for over 50% of all carbon emissions produced by UK businesses: Committing to the pledges made in COP26 of the net zero emissions target, British SMEs may reap benefits that are significant. After Brexit and Covid-19, there is an increasing need for support in their effort to be environmentally responsible, since short and/or medium-term growth and recovery would be otherwise long-term impossible (this is also being challenged by recent events in international energy markets).  In this seminar we hope to shed some light about what is possible or not for UK SMEs after COP26. Implications for HEIs in the dissemination of practices are as well explored.

Speakers

Organiser and Moderator: Dr Mary Arrieta (University of Greenwich, EIB Greenwich Faculty of Business, PEGFA and ISBE member)

Dr Robyn Owen (Middlesex University Business School) Centre for Enterprise and Economic Development Research (CEEDR) and Greenfin Research Hub, Middlesex University, London and Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Centre for Understanding Sustainable Prosperity (CUSP).

Presentation title: Seeding Green Innovation to Build Back Better: A Critique of UK Green SME Finance Policy

Abstract: The UK government has announced a £12bn green rebuilding plan for the UK, but there is no specific mention of green SME innovation finance. This paper focuses on early-stage Cleantech innovation finance in the UK. It argues that if the UK wishes to pursue the policy of aspiring "World leader" in green finance and innovation it rapidly requires increased focus and investment on cleantech innovations that will shape the future of global Climate Change.

Prof Ciarán Mac an Bhaird (Dublin City University)

Presentation title: TBA

Mr Brishni Mukhopadhyay (CFA – ESG Specialist at Western Asset Management) 
Presentation title: Sustainable Finance Education and Sustainable Finance Practices in the UK: Are SMEs accounted for?

Time: 18:00 – 20:00 GMT

Details: This is an online event. It will be hosted on Microsoft Teams.


March 10: A shorter working week for a gender-equal green transition

The workshop will present findings from a report by Ozlem Onaran and Robert Calvert Jump for the Women’s Budget Group (WBG) Feminist Green New Deal Project and explore the potential impact of a shorter working week with contributions by Sara Reis and Will Stronge. Link to the report:

https://wbg.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/Shorter-Working-Week-Report.pdf

Speakers

Prof Leigh Doster, PVC, Greenwich Business School: Opening Remarks

Prof Ozlem Onaran, co-director of PEGFA and professor of economics at the University of Greenwich

Dr Robert Calvert Jump, research fellow at the University of Greenwich

Dr Sara Reis, Deputy Director, Head of Research and Policy, WBG

Dr Will Stronge, ESRC Fellow at Brighton University and Co-Director of Autonomy

Chair: Ines Heck, PhD Economics students at the University of Greenwich

Time: 18:00 – 19:30 GMT

Location: This is a hybrid event. For online attendees please join us on Microsoft Teams. For those attending in person, the event will be in Lecture Theatre QA065, Queen Anne Building, Old Royal Naval College, Park Row, London SE10 9LS.


March 16: Fertility, electricity and television: is there a link? Evidence from Pakistan, 1990-2018

In 1960s Pakistan, every woman was giving birth to more than 6 children on average. In 2021, Pakistan still has the second highest fertility rate in South Asia with every woman giving birth to 3.4 children on average. This paper uses four waves of Demographic and Health Survey data to empirically analyse trends in fertility in Pakistan between 1990 and 2018; accounting for wealth, education and locational differences, this paper looks at three additional pathways for reducing fertility: (i) electrification, (ii) access to TV and (iii) family planning commercials broadcast on television. We employ multi-level fixed effects and the average yearly district-wealth level access to the three channels as instrumental variable. Across models we show that electricity does not reduce fertility. In contrast, access to television appears to have a significant effect in reducing fertility rates, which seems to operate to a large extent through family planning commercials broadcast on television. The content and evolution of Pakistani soap-operas is also discussed, and it is argued that the role models, the types of households and the messages conveyed by these soap-operas may represent strong pathways for the fertility decline.

Speakers

Dr. Luca Tasciotti, Senior Lecturer in Economics at the University of Greenwich

Dr Natascha Wagner

Dr Farooq Sulheria

Time: 17:00 – 18:30 GMT

Location: This is a hybrid event. For online attendees please join us on Microsoft Teams. For those attending in person, the event will be in Room QA063, Queen Anne Building, Old Royal Naval College, Park Row, London SE10 9LS.


March 30: The roles of standards for trade in changing the (economic) environment

The number of plant and animal species under threat of extinction our current geological epoch is unprecedented. Environmental standards have been promoted as a policy guideline that can effectively regulate the effect of human activity on the environment. In an ever-interconnected world, environmental standards have multiple effects which affect trade patterns, environmental protection, poverty, economic development and employment across countries. This talk with economists, social scientists and environmental activists links environmental standards for trade with several issues that have recently received attention: environmental protection and conservation, trade, corruption, environmental justice and human rights.

Speakers

Dr. Elissaios Papyrakis, Senior Lecturer in Development Economics (Macroeconomics) at the Institute of Social Studies of the Erasmus University Rotterdam

Prof. Lorenzo Pellegrini, Associate Professor of Economics of Environment and Development at the International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam

Dr. Luca Tasciotti, Senior Lecturer in Economics at the University of Greenwich
Plus more to be announced

Time: 17:00 – 18:30 GMT

Location: This is a hybrid event. For online attendees please join us on Microsoft Teams. For those attending in person, the event will be in Room QA063, Queen Anne Building, Old Royal Naval College, Park Row, London SE10 9LS.


Feb 8: A shorter working week as part of a green, caring economy as part of the Feminist Green New Deal project

PEGFA will present their project A shorter working week as part of a green, caring economy as part of the Feminist Green New Deal project of the Women's Budget Group and Women's Environmental Network

Speakers

Professor Özlem Onaran and Dr. Robert Calvert Jump, University of Greenwich.

More details about this event will be announced on our website.

Time: 13:00 GMT

Location: This is an online event.


Feb 16: Worker autonomy and wage divergence: Evidence from European survey data

This paper contributes to the understanding of increasing wage inequality in Western Europe. We ask if worker autonomy, defined as the degree of control workers have over their own work process, can explain wage growth differences in Western European countries from 2003 to 2018. We provide econometric analyses using individual-level wage data from the European Union Survey of Income and Living Conditions and find that wages in occupations with high autonomy have grown significantly faster than in occupations with low autonomy. Because workers in high autonomy occupations are generally at the top of the wage distribution, this process has increased wage inequality. We use additional worker surveys to shed light on technological, institutional, and demographic determinants of the ‘autonomy premium’ and highlight three main findings: (i) The autonomy premium is higher in countries with lower collective bargaining; (ii) the autonomy premium increases more in industries with faster computerisation; (iii) the rising autonomy premium increases gender inequality because women are less likely to be employed in high autonomy occupations, but we do not find differences in the increase of the autonomy premium between women and men. These findings suggest that wage inequality between high and low-autonomy jobs is shaped by technological as well as institutional factors.

Speakers

Thomas Rabensteiner, PhD Candidate in Economics (University of Greenwich)

Dr Alexander Guschanski, Senior Lecturer in Economics (University of Greenwich)

Time: 17:00 – 18:30 GMT

Location: This is a hybrid event. For online attendees please join us on Microsoft Teams. For those attending in person, the event will be in Room QA063, Queen Anne Building, Old Royal Naval College, Park Row, London SE10 9LS.


Feb 23: Analysing the link between periods of financial bonanza and premature de-industrialization in developing countries

The outbreak of Covid-19 brought back to the forefront the crucial importance of structural change and productive development for economic resilience to economic shocks. Several recent contributions have already stressed the perverse relation that may exist between productive backwardness and the intensity of the Covid-19 socio-economic crisis. In this paper, we analyse the factors that may have hindered productive development for over four decades before the pandemic. We investigate the role of (non-FDI) net capital inflows as a potential source of premature de-industrialization. We consider a sample of 36 developed and developing countries from 1980 to 2017, with major emphasis on the case of emerging and developing (EDE) economies in the context of increasing financial integration. We show that periods of abundant capital inflows may have caused the significant contraction of manufacturing share to employment and GDP, as well as the decrease of the economic complexity index. We also show that phenomena of “perverse” structural change are significantly more relevant in EDE countries than advanced ones. Based on such evidence, we conclude with some policy suggestions highlighting capital controls and external macroprudential measures taming international capital mobility as useful policy tools for promoting long-run productive development on top of strengthening (short-term) financial and macroeconomic stability.

Speakers

Prof. Alberto Botta (Associate Professor in Economics)

Time: 17:00 – 18:30 GMT

Location: This is a hybrid event. For online attendees please join us on Microsoft Teams. For those attending in person, the event will be in Room QA063, Queen Anne Building, Old Royal Naval College, Park Row, London SE10 9LS.


Jan 26: Does technological innovation affect inequalities? Separating the pure innovation effect from the rent extraction effect

The empirical literature draws on reduced-form models to estimate the effects of technological innovation on inequality. We argue that such models may not identify the true effect because market power and labour-market institutions affect both innovation and inequalities at the same time. To identify the true effect, we adopt a structural equation modeling (SEM) approach in which markups and labour-market deregulation determine innovation, capital share and inequality simultaneously. Using an unbalanced panel of 34 countries from 2000-2018, we find that the main driver of inequalities is not technological innovation per se, but markups and labour-market deregulation that increase capital share and worsen inequalities at the same time. Post-estimation evidence indicates that human capital and fiscal/monetary policy variables we control for are insufficient to reverse the adverse effects of capital share, markups and labour-market deregulation on inequalities. Our findings are robust to sample variation, two different markup measures, and five different measures of inequality.

Speakers

Professor Mehmet Ugur

Time: 16:00 – 17:00 BST

This event will be hosted online at 4pm on Microsoft Teams.

Location: Room HH103, Hamilton House, University of Greenwich, 15 Park Vista, SE10 9LZ


2021

Nov 4: Decarbonising the Bank of England's monetary policy

The aim of the event is to discuss how the Bank of England can decarbonise its monetary policy under its new climate neutrality mandate. A new UoG, New Economics Foundation, SOAS, and UWE report will be presented which focuses on alternative approaches for greening the Corporate Bonds Purchase Scheme.

More details about this event will be announced on our website. This event will be online and registration is open and free.

Date: Thurs, 4 November 2021

Time: 17:30 – 19:30 BST

Location: This event will be online.

Sign up link: This event is free.


Nov 17: Global Finance, Governance and Socio-Ecological Transformation: Insights for Progressive Strategies from the Special Issue and a COP26 debrief - what has been achieved?

*** Due to unforeseen circumstances, this event will now be held only online. Please do not attend the in person event on campus. We are sorry for any inconvenience caused and look forward to seeing you at the webinar. ***

Green finance has been increasingly presented as being an effective solution to global environmental problems and climate change.  However, today’s global financial structures tend to reproduce global inequalities and contribute to continued, highly unequal over-use and destruction of the environment, as well as a global ecological crisis.

Fossil fuel dependent world economy needs to rapidly decarbonise and that needs to be adequately financed and equally adequately governed and managed. The above begs questions about the sources of funding, targets of it, modes of governance and ownership of productive and reproductive systems that are to emerge, replace what is clearly not working, what is driving the global heating.

This workshop will (1) build on the scholarship collated in the Special Issue “The Global Political Economy of Green Finance and Socio-Ecological Transformation”, in Das Journal für Entwicklungspolitik (2021) Jaeger, J. and L. Schmidt, Eds. and (2) aim to assess the progress/regress of the COP26 and what it means for the problematic raised in the SI.

Speakers

Dr Yuliya Yurchenko, Senior Lecturer in Political Economy

Professor Johannes Jaeger, Professor and Economics coordinator at the University of Applied Sciences BFI Vienna

Plus more speakers TBA

Date: 17 November 2021

Time: 17:30 – 19:30 BST

Sign up link: This event is free.

Webinar link: The webinar can be accessed online.


Nov 18: Time to remit: The effect of remittances on household consumption in India. A panel analysis of the India Human Development Survey.

India has enjoyed over twenty years of rapid economic growth. The benefits of this growth, however, have largely by-passed India's poor: around a quarter of the world's malnourished children lives in India, and their wasted bodies and stunted lives represent a challenge for the Indian government. Although the growth in India's domestic economy did not result in many trickle-down benefits for the hungry poor, anecdotal evidence suggests that food security has benefited from another factor. Both rural or urban families have become increasingly reliant on remittances and used them to improve their food security. This paper explores the pattern of relationship between remittances received and food consumption at the household level; the paper uses a panel data approach with data coming from two rounds of the ‘India Human Development Survey’ (IHDS) conducted in 2005 and in 2011-12, and employs an instrumental variable approach to control for the endogeneity of remittances. The econometric results indicate that remittances do have a significant positive effect on the size of expenditure on food, as well as on two key indicators of food diversity, the Shannon and the Simpson Index. Results are robust to models’ specification and support the view that remittances do represent a mechanism by which households improve their food security.

Speakers

Dr Luca Tasciotti, Senior Lecturer in Economics

Dr Navjot Sangwan, Senior Lecturer in Economics

Time: 17:30 – 19:30 BST

Location: Room QA063, Queen Anne Building, Old Royal Naval College, Park Row, London SE10 9LS


** Postponed due to strike  ** The scope of fiscal policy to tackle climate change

How will we pay for the green new deal? This workshop will debate how to conduct truly sustainable fiscal policy and public investment.

Speakers

Dr Cem Oyvat, Senior Lecturer in economics at the University of Greenwich

Dr Rafael Wildauer, Senior Lecturer in economics at the University of Greenwich

Chair: Prof Ozlem Onaran, co-director of PEGFA and professor of economics at the University of Greenwich

Plus more speakers TBA

More details about this event will be announced soon.

Date: 2 December 2021

Time: 17:30 – 19:30 BST

Location: Online webinar

Sign up link: This event is free.

Webinar link: The webinar can be accessed online.


Dec 8: Sustainable economy is a cooperative economy

Overview

Cooperation Jackson is a network of worker cooperatives and solidarity economy institutions based in Jackson, Mississippi. The network consists of four interconnected and interdependent institutions: a federation of emerging local worker cooperatives, a cooperative incubator, a cooperative education and training center, and a cooperative financing system.

The broad mission of Cooperation Jackson is to advance the development of a regenerative economy in Jackson, MS based on a program centered around food sovereignty, which is rooted in the practices of agroecology, combined with local resourcing provisioning to build a locally grounded supply chain production that is rooted in the practices of working class self-organization and economic democracy to create a sustainable future.

Speakers

Kali Akuno, Director of Cooperation Jackson

Dr Adotey Bing-Pappoe, Senior lecturer in economics at The University of Greenwich

Time: 17:30 – 19:30 BST

This is an online event.

Sign up link: This event is free.

Webinar link: The webinar can be accessed online.


October 7: is the Silvertown tunnel compatible with London's climate commitments?

The Silvertown Tunnel is a proposed four-lane road tunnel across the Thames, to be built a few metres east of the Blackwall Tunnel. It has been commissioned by the Greater London Authority from the Riverlinx consortium and is scheduled for completion in 2025. The GLA says that the cost, which it estimates at £1.2 billion but opponents say is £2.2 billion, will be met by road tolling.

Climate and transport researchers have argued that the project is incompatible with London’s own climate targets, which require a substantial overall decrease in traffic volumes in the next decade. It will also exacerbate local air pollution problems, and community campaigners and doctors have called for its cancellation for that reason.

The tunnel project raises wider questions about London’s transport system and urban planning. Opponents, including the Labour party’s own London regional conference, are calling for alternative approaches with more investment in public transport and non-motor modes.

This is a “hybrid” event that you can attend in person on the university campus, or on line

Speakers

Rachel Aldred, Professor of Transport and Director of the Active Travel Academy, University of Westminster

Andrew Boswell, Independent Scientist and Consultant on Climate Emergency Planning and Policy

Simon Pirani, author of The Silvertown Tunnel is in a hole, so Stop Digging; Senior Research Fellow, Oxford Institute for Energy Studies

Date: Thu, 7 October 2021

Time: 17:00 – 20:30 BST

Location: Hamilton House, University of Greenwich, 15 Park Vista, SE10 9LZ

Sign up link: This event is free.


Online Conference: Inequalities and policy implications after Covid-19

Whether we look at wealth, race, gender, health, or income, the pandemic has exposed, and in some cases exacerbated, pre-existing inequalities. From Black Lives Matter to new wealth taxes, the visibility of inequality has generated a strong response from social movements and policy makers. This raises many questions that have long been at the heart of policy - what causes inequality? What policies stop it rising? And does it ultimately lead to instability?

Programme

12:30 Opening remarks: Vice Chancellor Professor Jane Harrington, University of Greenwich (UoG)

12:45 Keynote speech 1

Chair: Ozlem Onaran, Professor of Economics, Co-director of PEGFA, UoG

Transformatory strategies to reduce inequalities after Covid-19: creating caring economies, Diane Elson, Emeritus Professor University of Essex,

13:15 Tackling wealth inequalities

Chair: Aleksandar Stojanovic, Professor and HoD of Accounting and Finance, Co-director of PEGFA

Tax wealth to fund purple and green public investment, Ozlem Onaran, Professor of Economics, Co-director of PEGFA

The fall and rise of the top 1%: is wealth inequality determined by new technologies, globalisation, progressive taxation, or worker’s bargaining power? Ben Tippet, PhD Research Student, UoG,

The distribution of wealth in Europe and a European wealth tax, Rafael Wildauer, Senior Lecturer in Economics, UoG

Producer cooperatives as pre-distribution: Lessons from Emilia Romagna, Adotey Bing-Pappoe, Senior Lecturer in Economics, UoG

15:00 Keynote speech 2

Chair: Jeff Powell, Programme Leader UG Economics, UoG

Informality and intersectionality of race, gender and class inequality: The impact of Covid-19 policy responses in developing countries, Jayati Ghosh, Professor of Economics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

15:30 Race, gender, class inequalities and development

Chair: Julia Mundy, Deputy director of PEGFA, UoG

The Effects of Public Social Infrastructure and Gender Equality on Output and Employment: The case of South Korea, Cem Oyvat, Senior Lecturer in Economics , UoG

Neoliberal de-development and social reproduction in the post-Soviet space: erosion of women’s rights, social protection and security in Ukraine, Yuliya Yurchenko, Senior Lecturer in Political Economy, UoG

Capitalism, labour and race: the role of accounting in the Indian Maritime labourers, Antonella Russo, Senior Lecturer in Financial Accounting, UoG

The impact of Global Value Chain participation on income inequality in Emerging Economies, Alexander Guschanski, Lecturer in Economics, UoG

17:15 Finance, regional development and inequalities

Chair: Maria Nikolaidi, Assoc. Prof., UoG

Estimating workforce jobs data for British local authority districts, 1981-2018, Rob Calvert Jump, Research Fellow in Economics, PEGFA, UoG

Unconventional monetary policy and inequality, Alberto Botta (Programme Leader MSc Economics, UoG), Eugenio Caverzasi (Università Politecnica delle Marche), Alberto Russo(Università Politecnica delle Marche), Mauro Gallegati (Università Politecnica delle Marche), Joseph Stiglitz (Columbia University)

Inequalities in accessing finance: Has government support equipped British credit union sector to meet post Covid challenges? Sallyanne Decker, Principal Lecturer in Banking and Finance, UoG

Bank Credit Risk and Macro-Prudential Policies: Role of Liquidity in Uncertain times, Nadia Benbouzid (Senior Lecturer, UoG), Abishek Kumar, Sushanta Mallick (Professor of International Finance, Queen Mary), Ricardo Sousa (Associate Professor in Economics, University of Minho), Aleksandar Stojanovic (Professor, Head of Accounting and Finance, Finance, Co-director of PEGFA)

Tuesday 23 March 2021 12:30-18:45 (GMT)


Research Webinar: A dataset of workforce job counts for British local authority districts, 1981-2018

Speaker
Dr Rob Calvert Jump

Abstract
This paper presents workforce job counts for British local authority districts between the years 1981 and 2018. The estimates are produced by adjusting local authority job counts drawn from the Census of Employment, Annual Employment Survey, Annual Business Inquiry, and Business Register and Employment Survey to match regional job counts drawn from the Workforce Jobs dataset. The result is a measure of sub-regional workforce jobs which is consistent with publicly available national statistics, and can be motivated as a maximum entropy estimator. To illustrate the use of the dataset, the employment effects of European Union Objective 1 funding are examined using a synthetic control method.

Wednesday 3rd February 14:00-16:00 (GMT)
Click here to join the seminar (No sign up needed)


Research Webinar: Central Bank Power versus the tyranny of financial markets: liquidity preference in a world of endogenous money

Speakers
Dr Alberto Botta and Professor Marco Missaglia

Abstract
In this paper we present a simple Keynesian model about the role of liquidity preference in the determination of economic performance. We assume a world of endogenous money, where the banking system is able to fix the interest rate at a level of its own willing. Even in this framework, we show that the Keynesian theory of liquidity preference, while obviously not constituting anymore a theory for the determination of the interest rate, continues to be a fundamental piece of theory for the determination of the level and evolution of aggregate income over time, both in the short and in the medium run. However powerful, the banking system and monetary authorities are not the deus ex machina of our economies and financial markets are likely to exert a permanent influence on our economic destiny.

Tuesday 9th February  14:00-16:00 (GMT)
Click here to join the meeting (no sign up needed)


Research Webinar: Does intellectual property protection deliver economic benefits? A multi-outcome meta-regression analysis of the evidence

Speaker
Professor Mehmet Ugur

Abstract
Both theoretical and empirical research on intellectual property protection (IPP) report contingent and conflicting findings on how IPP affects related outcomes such as innovation, technology diffusion, productivity, or growth. To establish where the balance of the evidence lies and identify the sources of heterogeneity in the evidence base, we conduct a multi-outcome meta-regression analysis that takes account of dependence, unobserved heterogeneity, and publication selection at the same time. Drawing on 91 primary studies that report 1,626 effect-size estimates for one or more outcomes, we find that IPP does not spur innovation, technology diffusion, productivity, or economic growth. The effects remain statistically or practically insignificant under different scenarios concerning model specification, effect-size standardisation, and ‘best practice’ scenarios for research. Our work offers two contributions to existing knowledge: (i) we extend the application of the multi-outcome meta-regression analysis into evidence synthesis in economics; and (ii) we provide verifiable/replicable evidence indicating that the sanguine claims about the IPP’s economic benefits encountered in some legal studies and the advocacy literature are misleading.

Tuesday 16th February 14:00 – 16:00 (GMT)
Click here to join the meeting (no sign in required)


Webinar: A Sub-national Resource Curse? A synthetic-control approach to the case of hydrocarbons in Basilicata, Italy

Speaker

Dr Luca Tasciotti

Abstract

Basilicata is a region of Southern Italy where the expansion of oil operations in the 1990s was promoted as an opportunity to foster economic development. In 2020, Basilicata is one of the poorest regions in Europe despite the exploitation of the largest onshore hydrocarbon reserves of the continent. The coincidence of high poverty rates with abundant natural resources suggests that the region is experiencing a 'resource curse'; however, socio-economic problems predate the oil boom, complicating any causality claim. To disentangle and estimate the effects of oil exploitation, we employ the synthetic control method that compares the actual trends of development indicators of Basilicata with a counterfactual that is created by taking a weighted average of trends of other Italian regions --a 'synthetic' Basilicata.

The analysis finds that the development of oil operations has generated no detectable improvement to employment, nor to a range of social indicators, nor educational attainment. The absence of quantifiable beneficial effects is coupled with negative impacts on other dimensions of development that are more difficult to estimate --the environment and human health. Taken together the evidence offers a sobering prospect over the potential of resource-based development for disadvantaged regions in developed countries.

Time: 26th January, 4pm
Sign up link to be uploaded soon


2020

Webinar: 3000 Years of Discrimination and Counting: How Caste Still Matters in the Indian Credit Sector

Speaker
Dr Navjot Sangwan

Abstract
The caste system has dominated the social, political and economic lives of Indian people for over three thousand years. Since independence, the Indian government has introduced a flood of quotas, schemes and affirmative action to tackle caste discrimination. Can seventy years of government policy reverse three thousand years of oppression? Taking a close look at the country's credit system reveals that a new, more subtle, and less overt form of discrimination appears to be emerging, and becoming more widespread. This paper examines whether caste-based differences influence the amount of credit sanctioned to borrowers in India utilising data from the India Human Development Survey collected in 2005 and 2011-12. Using the Blinder–Oaxaca decomposition method, along with the Heckman procedure and the instrumental variable approach to correct for selection and simultaneity bias, I find substantial credit differentials between the general caste and other lower castes. I also show evidence of caste discrimination against the lower castes. The results of this research have been complemented by qualitative data gathered from interviewing lower caste borrowers in North India to understand the nature of discrimination and obstacles faced by them in the credit sector.

Time: Tuesday 8th December, 3.30pm
Click here to join the meeting [no need to sign up]
Working paper: PDF
Further details: here


Webinar: COVID-19, ecological, economic, social and financial sustainability

The scale of the COVID-19 crisis and its economic impact is unprecedented. Yet, even before the public health crisis struck, there were serious questions about the ecological, financial and social sustainability of our economy.

As economists from the Greenwich Political Economy Research Centre and the Institute of Political Economy, Governance, Finance and Accountability (PEGFA), we are hosting a series of webinars exploring the economic challenges of our time: from COVID-19 to the ecological, financial and social sustainability of modern capitalism.

Every Thursday at 3pm, a leading researcher from our research centre will run a free online seminar on their area of expertise, to help us make sense of these tumultuous times.

May 21: Fighting the COVID-19 emergency and relaunching the European economy: debt monetization and recovery bonds. Presentation slidesVideo

May 28: Investing in social infrastructure and equality: lessons for macroeconomic policy from the pandemic Presentation slidesVideo

June 4: COVID-19 and the public finances: Another ten years of austerity? Presentation slides |  Video

June 11: Class in the time of COVID-19: how the crisis has exposed class divides Presentation slidesVideo

June 18: Greening the Bank of England COVID-19 QE programme Presentation slidesVideo

June 22: Cooperatives: democracy, equality, and efficiency

July 2: Reflections on innovation policy after Covid-19: What does the microeconometric evidence tell us? Presentation slides

July 9: The political economy of income distribution – why is income inequality increasing and what can we do about it? Presentation slidesVideo

July 14: Is the European Green Deal ambitious enough? Presentation slidesVideo

In relation to the European Green Deal, please find two recent papers connected to European energy policy from GPERC academic Dr Yuliya Yurchenko Paper 1Paper 2

Download Full Programme here.


Postponed: Rethinking Economics 2020: salvage the future

The future is uncertain. From ecological breakdown to precarious work, many people feel that business as usual is leading us towards a dead end. However, despite all the pessimism and fear, young people across the globe are demanding change - on the streets and in the classroom.

While dissenting students in economics have raised an unlimited number of questions about the future, answers from the mainstream remain scarce. Is our economics education fit to meet the challenges of the coming decade? What economic issues are behind this sense of decline? And do we need systemic change to salvage the future? On March 28 2020, Rethinking Economics Greenwich (REG) will host a festival of ideas to tackle these questions.

Speakers include Grace Blakeley, Jonathan Aldred, Daniela Gabor, Özlem Onaran, Nick Srnieck and many more...
  • Time: Saturday 28 March 10am to 6pm
  • Location: Room QA080, Queen Anne Court, Greenwich Campus, University of Greenwich
  • Tickets: Tickets are free but please sign up here, where you will find more information about speakers, location and details.

European Green Deal: From ambitions to reality

PEGFA researcher Dr Rafael Wildauer is presenting a policy paper on the European Green Deal. This is the first output from a larger project together with the Foundation for European Progressive Studies, the Karl Renner Institute and the Chamber of Labour Vienna. The policy paper analyses the current proposals around the European Green Deal and compares them with the current scientific evidence coming out of climate science. Julia Herr, member of the Austrian Parliament and Niels Fuglsang, member of the European Parliament will provide a political assessment.

Please find the full programme here and register here.

  • Monday 15th June
  • 12:30 - 14:00
  • Registration link here
  • Full Programme here

International Cooperative Webinar

The Institute of Political Economy, Governance, Finance and Accountability (PEGFA), in association with the African Cooperative union, is hosting an International Cooperative Webinar on Saturday 20th June.

The conference will take the form of four plenaries: The first will feature presentations from leading academics on cooperative economics and African peoples' empowerment. In the second, practitioner organisations involved in promoting African peoples' economic empowerment in the UK will speak about what they do. The third plenary will be devoted to institutions that provide technical of financial support to cooperatives. In the final plenary, which will be a 'meeting of the whole' those present will be invited to explore strategies to raise the level of cooperation among African people's cooperatives in the UK.

Speakers

Keynote: Professor Jessica Gordon-Nembhard | "The African American Cooperative Empowerment Experience"

Professor Esther Gicheru | Cooperative University of Keyna | "The Keynan Cooperative Experience"

Professor Gibril Faal | LSE | "The African Diaspora Experience in the UK and Continental Connections"

Professor Kehinde Andrews | Birmingham City University and author of Black to Black: Retelling Black radicalism for the 21st Century |  "The Social and Economic Circumstances of People of African Descent"

  • Saturday 20th June | 15:00 BST to 18:30 BST
  • For tickets and more information please see here

9th PKES Summer School – Introduction to Post Keynesian Economics and Political Economy

This event will now be hosted online.

This four-day summer school introduces Post Keynesian Economics as an alternative to mainstream neoclassical economic theory and neo-liberal economic policy. Key assumptions in Post Keynesian Economics are that individuals face fundamental uncertainty about the future; there is a central role for 'animal spirits' in the determination of investment decisions; inflation is the result of unresolved distributional conflicts; money is an endogenous creation of the private banking system; unemployment is determined by effective demand on the goods markets; financial markets are prone to periodic boom-bust cycles.

The summer school is aimed at students of economics and social sciences. As the aim of Post Keynesian Economics and Political Economy ultimately is to provide the foundation for progressive economic policies, it may be of interest for a broader audience.


Open Day: MSc Economics

VIDEO RECORDING HERE

The scale of the COVID-19 crisis and its economic impact is unprecedented. Yet even before the public health crisis struck, there were serious questions about the ecological, financial and social sustainability of our economy.

There has never been a more pressing time to learn economics. Policies are now being implemented across the world to deal with the health crisis which just a few months ago were considered radical. This shows more clearly than ever that economics is a broad discipline, with a wide range of perspectives and policies. The MSc economics at the University of Greenwich is situated within this pluralist tradition, providing a real world understanding of the economy from different theoretical perspectives, including post-keynesian, ecological, feminist, neoclassical and marxist.

On Monday 11 May, four leading academics who teach on the MSc programme will host a free, online open day to talk you through the programme and how it relates to their research. The open day is aimed at anyone who is potentially interested in learning about the economy and you do not need a formal background in economics to attend.

*Dr Alberto Botta, senior lecturer in economics

*Professor Özlem Onaran, professor of economics

*Professor Mehmet Ugur, professor of economics

*Dr. Maria Nikolaidi, senior lecturer in economics

Moderated by two current Greenwich Rethinking Economics students, Thomas Rabensteiner and Ben Tippet, the event is an opportunity to ask any questions you might have about undertaking an MSc degree: Why economics? Why Greenwich? And why pluralism?

  • Time: Monday 11 May 28 2pm to 4pm
  • Online: webinar link will be sent via link below
  • Tickets: Tickets are free but please sign up here, where you will find more information about speakers, location and details.

CANCELLED: Innovation Symposium

This event is now cancelled.

Despite considerable interest, and with heart-felt regret, we have decided to cancel the symposium.

This is due to two sources of uncertainty.
One source is the ongoing strike action in a large number of UK universities and its implications for people's schedules over the next few weeks. The other source is the developments around the Corona virus, which reflect increased emphasis on containment and precautions globally.
Coming to this conclusion has not been easy for us. We hope to be able to reschedule after the Easter break.

Morbid Symptoms: The Global Rise of the Far-Right

We would like to invite you to an exciting book event at the University of Greenwich with author and academic Dr Owen Worth. Dr Yuliya Yurchenko will introduce and host the discussion.

As established centrist parties across the Western world continue to decline, commentators continue to fail to account for the far-right's growth, for its strategies and its overall objectives.

Morbid Symptoms examines the far-right's ascendancy, uniquely tracing its history from the end of the Cold War, revealing how its different dimensions have led to a series of contradictory strategies and positions that often leave their overall significance unclear. From the United States to Russia and from Britain across Europe to Greece, Owen Worth's analysis reveals that the left's failure to mount a radical alternative to the prevailing order has allowed the far-right to move in and provide an avenue for discontent and for change. Crucially though this avenue hasn't necessarily offered a definite alternative to the status quo as yet, meaning there is still a chance to change its significance in the wider global order. This is an essential primer to the future of international politics and international relations.

We will send further details closer to the date of the event and look forward to seeing you then. ​
  • Time: Thursday 30 January 2020 5pm to 7pm
  • Authors: Dr Owen Worth
  • Location: Room QA175, Queen Anne Building, Greenwich Campus, University of Greenwich
  • Tickets: while the event if free we ask you to sign up via this link

2019

Understanding dollarization: a Keynesian/Kaleckian perspective

We would like to invite you to an exciting seminar with Dr Robert Calvert Jump, who has recently joined PEGFA (University of Greenwich) as a research fellow. What does "dollarization" mean in a world of endogenous money, i.e. a world where money is not (only) created by printing pieces of paper, but (mainly) by making loans? Is it true that dollarization only constitutes a limitation of sovereignty in the short run (making it harder to run standard stabilization macro policies) or can it slow the growth process of a country? The paper builds a theoretical, Keynesian-Kaleckian growth model for a dollarized economy in a framework of endogenous money to answer these questions. We will show that, ceteris paribus, the steady-state medium-term growth rate of a dollarized economy is lower than that of a country with its own currency. We will also show that a dollarized economy is more likely to be unstable than an economy with its own currency, in the specific sense that, everything else being equal, it is more likely for a dollarized economy to fall into a debt trap

We will send further details closer to the date of the event and look forward to seeing you then. ​
  • Time: Tuesday 4 February 5pm to 7pm
  • Authors: Marco Missaglia, Università di Pavia, Italy
  • Location: Room QA063, Queen Anne Court, Greenwich Campus, University of Greenwich.
  • Tickets: The event is free

Deprivation and the electoral geography of Brexit

We would like to invite you to an exciting seminar with Dr Robert Calvert Jump, who has recently joined PEGFA (University of Greenwich) as a research fellow.

We will send further details closer to the date of the event and look forward to seeing you then. ​
  • Time: Wednesday 11th December at 5pm
  • Authors: Robert Calvert Jump (University of Greenwich) and Jo Michell (University of the West of England).
  • Location: Room QA075, Queen Anne Court, Greenwich Campus, University of Greenwich.
  • Tickets: The event is free but please sign up here

Communicating Climate Change

I would like to draw your attention to an exciting upcoming event at the University of Greenwich, Communicating Climate Change, jointly organised by the Sustainability Technology and Innovation Research (STIR) group and Greenwich University Staff/Student Ecoteam.

  • Time: Wednesday 12th December 5.00 to 7.00pm
  • Location: Room D026, Dreadnaught building, Greenwich Campus, University of Greenwich.

Programme

5-00 -5-15 Introduction and general insight from research on communicating CC Topic opened and led by Fanny Paschek

5.15 -5-30 Ecoteam Greenwich – CC communication and action at Greenwich University Topic opened and led by Ecoteam Greenwich

5.30-6.00: Can popular culture raise public awareness of climate change? Topic opened by Anne-Marie Coles

6.00 -6.30: Do politicians listen? Strategies for sustainable policy change Topic opened by Allen Duncan,

6.30-7.00 Discussion on issues raised


The structural origins of authoritarianism

We would like to invite you to an exciting event with Professor Gabriel Porcile, UN O​fficer at the ECLAC, the UN Commission for Latin American and the Caribbean, and Director of the ECLAC Summer School on Latin American economies. He will give a seminar on "The structural origins of authoritarianism".

  • Time: Tuesday 5th November at 17:00
  • Location: Room QA075, Queen Anne Court, Greenwich Campus, University of Greenwicch.
  • Tickets: The event is free but please sign up via this link​.

The macroeconomic effects of income, wealth and gender inequalities and policies

  • Time: Monday 14 October 17:00 - 20:00
  • Location: Room QA080, Queen Anne Court, Greenwich Campus, University of Greenwich
  • Tickets: Tickets are free but please sign up here

We would like to invite you to a conference on "the macroeconomic effects of income, wealth and gender inequalities and policies" where we will present the results of our new project funded by the Rebuilding Macroeconomics, ESRC Network+. Speakers at the panel include Romina Boarini (OECD), Sangheon Lee (ILO), Angus Armstrong (NIESR, RM), Jerome De Henau (WBG), Ozlem Onaran (UoG), Cem Oyvat (UoG), and Denise Hawkes (UoG).

For more information and to see the program for the day, please follow the link here.


Innovation, firm dynamics, employment and growth: New developments in modelling and estimation

  • Time: Fri, 21 June 2019
  • Location: Greenwich Campus, University of Greenwich, SE109LS
  • Tickets: Tickets are free but please sign up here

The workshop brings together 14 original research papers authored by 43 distinguished contributors to the research field. The papers address five themes, four of which are substantive and one is methodological:

  • The patterns of job creation, job destruction and job reallocation by technology class, firm age/size and distance to the technology frontier
  • Sources of heterogeneity in the effects of innovation on firm survival and productivity growth by countries, sectors and firm types
  • Public support for innovation: Policy design and performance issues
  • Causal pathways and contingencies in the relationship between innovation and employment, productivity growth and survival.

The workshop is of interest for established researchers, PhD students and policy-makers. Presentations of papers listed below will be followed by comments from pre-assigned discussants and Q&A sessions.

The conference is being organised by Greenwich Political Economy Research Centre/ Institute of Political Economy, Governance, Finance and Accountability (GPERC/PEGFA) & The Department of Economic Policy at the Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milano.

For more information and to see the program for the day, please follow the link here.


8th PKES Summer School – Introduction to Post Keynesian Economics and Political Economy

  • Time: 26th - 28th June 2019
  • Place: Greenwich Campus, University of Greenwich, SE109LS
  • Tickets: Sign up link TBA
    • Workshop only (no accommodation): £25 (PKES members) / £45 (non-PKES members)
    • Workshop + accommodation for 3 nights (Wed-Fri, 25/06-28/06).
      Early Bird registration until 26 May: £60 (PKES members) / £80 (non-PKES members)
    • Workshop + accommodation for 3 nights (Wed-Fri, 25/06-28/06).
      After 26 May: £95 (PKES members) / £110 (non-PKES members)

This three-day summer school introduces Post-Keynesian Economics as an alternative to mainstream neoclassical economic theory and neoliberal economic policy. Key assumptions in Post Keynesian Economics are that individuals face fundamental uncertainty about the future; there is a central role for 'animal spirits' in the determination of investment decisions; inflation is the result of unresolved distributional conflicts; money is an endogenous creation of the private banking system; unemployment is determined by effective demand on the goods markets; financial markets are prone to periodic boom-bust cycles.

The summer school is aimed at students of economics and social sciences. As the aim of Post Keynesian Economics and Political Economy ultimately is to provide the foundation for progressive economic policies, it may be of interest for a broader audience.

Please sign up here


Sustainability, Technology and Innovation Research Workshop

  • Time: 25th June 2019 10.30am - 5pm
  • Place: QA210, Queen Anne Building Greenwich Campus, University of Greenwich, SE109LS
  • Tickets: Free event

Research round up of current projects happening at Greenwich.

For a full programme, please click here. 

30 - 31 March: Still Rethinking? The Need for Pluralism in Economics

  • Time: Weekend conference
  • Place: Queen Anne Building, University of Greenwich, SE10 9LS
  • Tickets: Sign up here
  • Conference website.

After the 2008 financial crisis, the call for different approaches and methodologies in Economics became irrefutable. But what has really changed in the way Economics is researched, taught and practiced? Is there progress towards a more pluralist agenda or are we facing a backlash from the established institutions? Should Economics be left entirely to economists? At Still Rethinking, we want to look at the current state of economics. The need for pluralism in Economics and for interdisciplinary approaches seems to be more urgent than ever. Today, only a handful of universities offer pluralist programmes.

The conference also aims at introducing undergraduate students to pluralism in Economics. We will look at challenges concerning economic theory, social relations, climate change, gender issues, inequalities, housing and Brexit, among other socially relevant urgent issues of our time. What has economics to offer regarding these challenges?

Speakers TBA soon. For more information, please see the official conference website.


The Spider's Web: Britain's Second Empire: Film Screening and Panel Discussion

  • Time: 6.00 – 9.00 pm.
  • Place: Room QA180, Queen Anne Building, University of Greenwich, SE10 9LS

Join us for this free film screening, followed by Q&A. The Spider's Web is an award-winning documentary investigating the world of Britain's secrecy jurisdictions and the City of London, and its impact on global tax revenues and public welfare.

Q&A after the film screening with:

  • John Christensen, Director, Tax Justice Network
  • Prem Sikka, Professor of Accounting, University of Essex
  • The panel will be chaired by Dr Lesley Catchpowle, Senior Lecturer in Social and Critical Accounting, University of Greenwich

Co-hosted by Rethinking Economics Greenwich, and the Institute for Political Economy, Governance, Finance and Accountability (PEGFA)

For more information please see the facebook event.

21 March: Celebrating 30 years of Professor Mehmet Ugur

You are cordially invited to celebrate Professor Mehmet Ugur's 30 years of teaching, research and scholarly activity at the University of Greenwich. The celebration will consist of a programme of exciting speakers followed by a drinks reception. The programme of speakers are:

  • Chair: Prof Ozlem Onaran, co-director of PEGFA
  • Opening by Pro VC Jonathan Sibson, Faculty of Business, University of Greenwich
  • Prof Denise Hawkes, HoD Dept of International Business and Economics, University of Greenwich
  • Prof Mehmet Ugur, deputy director of PEGFA
  • Prof Marco Vivarelli, Professor of Economics, Catholic University of Milano
  • Dr Sefa Awaworyi Churchill, Senior Research Fellow, RMIT University
  • Dr Noemi Levy-Aksu, LSE Teaching Fellow
  • Rob Copeland, University and College Union (UCU) Policy OfficerWe hope you will be able to join us to celebrate Professor Ugur's scholarly contributions and reflect on the future of academic freedom.

For more information please see here.


16 February: Transforming Finance Conference

  • Time: 10.30am - 5.30pm
  • Place: Room QA180, Queen Anne Building, University of Greenwich, SE10 9LS
  • Tickets: Sign up here
  • Conference website.

Transforming Finance aims to address the practical potential of a socialist finance. It will analyse the dominant power of the global financial system and outline the various ways that people are organising to challenge this power. Its aims are to use academic knowledge and lived experience to answer an unresolved but deeply important question: how can we make finance work for rather than against society?

Speakers for the day are:

  • Grace Blakeley, Economics commentator & Research Fellow at IPPR
  • Costas Lapavitsas, Professor of Economics at SOAS
  • Fran Boait - Executive Director at Positive Money
  • Laurie Macfarlane, Economics Editor at openDemocracy and research associate at IIPP
  • Brett Scott - Journalist, Campaigner, Author
  • Dr Adotey Bing-Pappoe, lecturer in Economics at University of Greenwich
  • Lavinia Steinfort - Researcher at Transnational Institute
  • Matthew Lawrence - Economist and former senior research fellow at IPPR
  • Ben Beach - Activist, organiser and architecture research student
  • Siôn Whellens - Cooperative worker at Calverts and director of Cooperative London
  • Dr Jeff Powell - Senior lecturer in Economics at University of Greenwich
  • Dr Maria Nikolaidi, Lecturer in Economics at University of Greenwich
  • Rhona Friedman - Criminal and human rights solicitor at Hickman & Rose and Bindmans LLP.
  • Lydia Hughes - IWGB trade union organiser with foster care workers and senior editor of Notes from Below

For more information please see the conference website above.


7 February: Asymmetric information and heterogeneous effects of R&D subsidies: Evidence on R&D investment and employment of R&D personnel

Research seminar by Prof Mehmet Ugur (University of Greenwich).  Location: University of Greenwich, Queen Anne Court, room QA 010. Time 17:00-18:00.

2018

  • Dr. Andrea Baronchelli, City University
  • Dr Marco Bardoscia, Bank of England
  • Kristian Bouw, CEO and founder of  notiontheory.com
  • Prof. Menelaos Karanasos, Brunel University

2017

  • 13 December 2017: The missing rich- power law modelling to tackle non-observation and non-response problems in household surveys. Research seminar by Rafael Wildauer (University of Greenwich). Co-organised by FEPS and GPERC. Location: University of Greenwich, Queen Anne Court, room QA165. Time 16:00-17:00.
  • 6 December 2017: The Economic Impact and Cause of Income Inequality: the shifting views of the international financial institutions, by John Evans. Co-organised by FEPS, University of Greenwich Business School, and GPERC. Location: University of Greenwich, King William Court room KW303. Time: 17:00-19:00. Chair and discussant: Professor Ozlem Onaran (FEPS Scientific Council member and Director of GPERC).
  • 29 November 2017: A European Future for Brexit Britain? Talk by Lord Roger Liddle, co-organised by FEPS, UoG Business School, and GPERC. Location: University of Greenwich, King William Court room KW303. Time: 17:00-19:00. Chair and discussant: Professor Ozlem Onaran (FEPS Scientific Council member and Director of GPERC).
  • 1 November 2017: Workshop on Growth and Income Distribution. Keynote speaker: Prof Marc Lavoie (Paris 13). Speakers include: Prof Engelbert Stockhammer (Kingston University), Prof Ozlem Onaran (GPERC), Dr Maria Nikolaidi (GPERC), Dr Rafael Wildauer (GPERC), Dr Cem Oyvat (GPERC), Dr Sakir Devrim Yilmaz (Kingston University). The workshop was chaired by Dr David Rinaldi (FEPS) and it is jointly organised by FEPS, GPERC, and the University of Greenwich. Queen Anne Court Room QA080. Time: 16:30-19:30.The programme and abstracts of the presentations are here.
  • 18 October 2017: A Dynamic Model of Global Value Chains: Degree of Monopsony Power, Consolidation and Symbiosis. Research seminar by Giorgos Galanis (Goldsmiths College) and Ashok Kumar (Birkbeck, University of London), jointly organised by FEPS, GPERC, and the department of International Business and Economics (IBE). University of Greenwich, Queen Anne Court, room QA065. Time: 16:00-18:00. Chair and discussant: Professor Ozlem Onaran (FEPS Scientific Council member and Director of GPERC).
  • 5 October 2017: The Complexity Approach to Post Keynesian Macro-modeling.
    Research seminar by Corrado Di Guilmi, University of Technology Sydney, jointly organised by FEPS and GPERC. University of Greenwich, Queen Anne Court, room QA065. Time: 17:00-19:00. Chair and discussant: Professor Ozlem Onaran (FEPS Scientific Council member and Director of GPERC).
  • 22 June 2017: Perspectives on Responsible Innovation and Sustainable Entrepreneurship
  • 12 April - June 2017: Lecture Series in Selected Topics Post-Keynesian, institutionalist, feminist and Marxian political economy.
  • 31 May - 1 June 2017: Conference co- organized by FEPS,     GPERC, and PKSG. University of Greenwich, Queen Anne Court, Room QA080. Speakers include Daniele Tori (Open University), Robert Jump (Kingston University), Roberto Veneziani (Queen Mary London), Roger Farmer (University of Warwick), Sebastian Dullien (HTW Berlin), Engelbert Stockhammer (Kingston University), Daniela Gabor (UWE), Jan Toporowski (SOAS) and Daniela Prates (UNICAMP, Brazil) among others. Chair and discussant: Professor Ozlem Onaran (FEPS Scientific Council member and Director of GPERC).
  1. Key note lecture by Dr Michael Kumhof, Bank of England, on "Income Distribution and Stability", and presentation of the results of the project "An investment and equality-led sustainable growth strategy", by Ozlem Onaran, Stephany Griffith-Jones, Lisa Kastner, Signe Dahl, Paul Sweeney, Maria Nikolaidi, Giovanni Cozzi, and Daniele Tori.The conference is jointly organised by FEPS, GPERC,  TASC and ECLM. University of Greenwich, Queen Anne court room QA080. Time: 17:00-19:30.
  2. 5 April 2017: Forgotten Macroeconomics in Mega Trade and Investment Deals

Research seminar by Dr Jeronim Capaldo, Tufts University, chaired by Dr Ernst Stetter, Secretary General, FEPS, and jointly organised by FEPS, GPERC, and the department of International Business and Economics (IBE). University of Greenwich Queen Anne Court room QA180. Time: 13:00-15:00. Dr Capaldo's talk is based on a synthesis of two papers on TTIP and TPP.

  • 29 March 2017: Does Inequality Hamper Innovation and Growth? An AB-SFC Analysis

Research seminar by Alberto Russo, Marche Polytechnic University, jointly organised by FEPS, GPERC, and the department of International Business and Economics (IBE). University of Greenwich, Stephen Lawrence building, room: SL007 Time: 13:00-14:00. Chair and discussant: Professor Ozlem Onaran (FEPS Scientific Council member and Director of GPERC).

  • 22 March 2017: Smooth Transition Analysis and Portfolio Optimization: the case of emerging- and frontier-equity markets

Research seminar by Francesco Guidi, jointly organised by FEPS, GPERC, and the department of International Business and Economics (IBE). University of Greenwich, Stephen Lawrence building, room: SL007. Time: 13:00-14:00. The seminar is based on the paper "Smooth Transition Analysis and Portfolio Optimization: the case of emerging- and frontier-equity markets", co-authored by Francesco Guidi, Christos Savva and Gabriella Cagliesi.

  • 15 March 2017: Wage-led vs Profit-led Growth: a comprehensive empirical analysis

Research seminar by Cem Oyvat,  jointly organised by FEPS, GPERC, and the department of International Business and Economics (IBE). University of Greenwich, Queen Mary building, room QM168. Time: 13:00-14:00.

  • 9 March 2017:  Postgraduate Research Students' Seminar on Sustainable Transitions

The student seminar is jointly organised by FEPS, GPERC, and STIR. University of Greenwich, Queen Mary court room QM168. Time: 16:00-17:00. For abstracts of the papers presented please visit here.

  • 8 March 2017, International Women's Day: Gender Equality for a Sustainable Economy

Book launch and discussion with Prof. Diane Elson (University of Essex), Heather Wakefield (Unison, Head of Local Government), Prof Ozlem Onaran (University of Greenwich, GPERC), Dr Hannah Bargawi (SOAS), Dr Giovanni Cozzi (University of Greenwich, GPERC), Dr Jerome de Henau (Open University), co-organised by FEPS, GPERC, and Women's Budget Group. University of Greenwich, Queen Anne Court room QA065. Time 17:00- 19:00.  For the details of the contributions, please visit here. Chair and discussant: Professor Ozlem Onaran (FEPS Scientific Council member and Director of GPERC).

  • 22 February 2017: "Non-linearities and Heterogeneity in R&D Productivity", seminar by Edna Solomon, jointly organised by FEPS, GPERC, and the department of International Business and Economics (IBE). University of Greenwich, Stephen Lawrence building, room: SL007 Time: 13:00-14:00
  • 2 February 2017: "The economic impact of Brexit in the age of secular stagnation", with Matthew Pennycook (MP for Greenwich and Woolwich and Shadow Minister for Exiting the European Union), Ms Sian Errington (Unite the Union, Political Officer), Mr John Palmer (former European Editor of The Guardian), Mr Andrew Harrop (Fabian Society, General Secretary), Prof Gerhard Stahl (the College of Europe in Brügge, Peking University HSBC Business School and FEPS Scientific Council), Prof Ozlem Onaran (Director of GPERC), Prof Mehmet Ugur (chair), co-organised by FEPS & GPERC. University of Greenwich, Queen Anne Court room QA065. Time: 17:00-19:00.
  • 1 February 2017: Seminar "How to tackle the subjective measurement of agency. An empirical application on Italy", by Toa Giroletti, University of Pavia, jointly organised by FEPS, GPERC, and the department of International Business and Economics (IBE). Part of this research has been implemented in collaboration with the EC funded project "CrESSI - Creating Economic Space for Social Innovation" (GA no: 613261). University of Greenwich, Stephen Lawrence building, room: SL007 Time: 13:00-14:00.
  • 26 January 2017: Book launch "Modern Monetary Theory and European Macroeconomics", by Dirk Ehnts, Chemnitz Technical University, jointly organised by FEPS & GPERC. University of Greenwich King William court room KW003. Time: 17:00- 19:00. Chair and discussant: Professor Ozlem Onaran (FEPS Scientific Council member and Director of GPERC).
  • 25 January 2017: "Coping with uncertainty: policy responses of central and local government authorities in the U.K.", Research seminar by Catalin Dragomirescu-Caina, Foundation for Progressive European Studies (FEPS), jointly organised by FEPS, GPERC, and the department of International Business and Economics (IBE). University of Greenwich Queen Anne court, room QA238. Time: 13:00-15:00.
  • 18 January 2017: "Within-industry size diversity and firm survival: Evidence from UK data", seminar by Prof Mehmet Ugur, jointly organised by FEPS, GPERC, and the department of International Business and Economics (IBE). University of Greenwich, Stephen Lawrence building, room: SL007 Time: 13:00-14:00.

2016

  • 14 December 2016: "Alleviating the Childcare Constraint for Women: Empirical Evidence from the UK", seminar by Dr Gabriella Cagliesi, jointly organised by GPERC, FEPS and the department of International Business and Economics (IBE). University of Greenwich Stephen Lawrence building, room SL106. Time: 13:00-14:00.
  • 10 December 2016: One-day workshop, exhibition and round-table discussion: "Democratic Transformations, Kurdish Women and Regional Conflict: Lessons from Rojava and beyond", jointly organised by GPERC and Peace in Kurdistan – Women's Alliance for Kurdistan, Iraq and Syria. University of Greenwich, King William Court room KW002. Time: 09:30-18:30
  • 7 December 2016: "Migration in Kenya: Beyond Harris-Todaro", seminar by Dr Cem Oyvat,  jointly organised by GPERC, FEPS and the department of International Business and Economics (IBE). University of Greenwich Stephen Lawrence building, room SL106.Time: 13:00-14:00.
  • 23 November 2016: "Prosperity without Growth in a Finite Planet" by Professor Tim Jackson, University of Surrey. Jointly organised by the Young Scholars Initiative (YSI) of the Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET), GPERC and the Foundation for European Progressive Studies (FEPS). University of Greenwich, Queen Anne Court room QA080. Time: 17:00- 19:00 talk.
  • 10 Nov 2016: "Money and Totality", by Professor Fred Moseley, Mount Holyoke College, USA, jointly organised by GPERC and FEPS. University of Greenwich Queen Anne Court room QA065. Time 17:00-19:00. No registration required, but spaces are limited.
  • 12 October 2016: "How much is enough" by Professor Lord Robert Skidelsky, jointly organised by the Young Scholars Initiative (YSI) of the Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET), GPERC and the Foundation for European Progressive Studies (FEPS). University of Greenwich Stockwell Street Library, 10 Stockwell Street, room 11_0004. Time: 16:00- 17:00 coffee welcome, 17:00- 19:00 talk.
  • 10 October 2016: "Capitalism: Competition, Conflict, Crises" by Professor Anwar Shaikh, of the New School University, USA, jointly organised by GPERC and FEPS. University of Greenwich, Queen Anne Court room QA180, time: 17:00- 19:00.
  • 28 June 2016: One-day workshop: "Smart Urban Transport Policy Futures III", co-organised by GPERC, FEPS and STIR (Sustainability Technology and Innovation Research Group) University of Greenwich, Queen Anne Court room QA210, time: 09:30-18:30. The event is partly funded by a British Academy/ Society for the Advancement of Management Studies grant.
  • 20 June 2016: One-day workshop: "Small steps towards sustainability: Exploring the distributed, fragmented and piecemeal aspects of socio-technical change", co-organised by GPERC, FEPS and STIR (Sustainability Technology and Innovation Research Group) University of Greenwich, Queen Anne Court room QA210, time: 10.00-16.00.
  • 15 June 2016: Panel discussion: "Remain for Change: Building European solidarity for a democratic economic alternative", with Keir Starmer MP,  Matt Wrack (General Secretary, Fire Brigades Union),  Ann Pettifor (Director, Policy Research in Macroeconomics-Prime), John Weeks (Emeritus Professor, SOAS),  Jeremy Smith (Convenor of EREP & Co-Director of PRIME), Jo Michell (Senior Lecturer, University of the West of England), Ozlem Onaran (Professor, University of Greenwich, GPERC), Engelbert Stockhammer (Professor, Kingston University) and Mehmet Ugur (Professor, University of Greenwich, GPERC), jointly organised by GPERC and FEPS. University of Greenwich, Queen Anne Court room QA080. Time: 18:00-20:00. The report of EREP can be downloaded here.
  • 10 June 2016: 26th Post Keynesian Study Group (PKSG) Annual Workshop, University of Greenwich. Organised by: Dr Maria Nikolaidi, University of Greenwich, Professor Ozlem Onaran, University of Greenwich, and Professor Engelbert Stockhammer, Kingston University. Jointly organized by PKSG, GPERC and FEPS.
  • 9 June 2016: Post-Keynesian Study Group (PKSG) Annual PhD Student Conference. Organised by: Professor Gary Dymski, University of Leeds,  and Professor Ozlem Onaran, Eurydice Fotopoulou, Alexander Guschanski, Thomas Obst, Daniele Tori, University of Greenwich. Time 9:00 - 19:00, University of Greenwich, Queen Anne Court, Room QA080. Jointly organized by PKSG, GPERC and FEPS.
  • 23 May 2016: Conference and Book Launch: "Investment Policies for Sustainable Growth" with Massimo D'Alema (Former Prime Minister of Italy and President of FEPS), Richard Burgon MP (Shadow Minister – Treasury), Markus Berndt (Head of Division at the European Investment Bank), Professor Ozlem Onaran, Professor Jan Toporowski, Dr. Ernst Stetter (FEPS), Dr Giovanni Cozzi, jointly organised by GPERC and FEPS. University of Greenwich Queen Ann Court, room QA080. Time: 16:00-18:45. More information about the book edited by Giovanni Cozzi, Susan Newman and Jan Toporowski.
  • 18 May 2016: Research seminar: Yun Kim: "Political Aspects of Household Debt", jointly organised by GPERC and FEPS. University of Greenwich, Queen Anne Court room QA020, time: 17:00-18:30.
  • 4 May 2016: Research seminar: Professor Mehmet Ugur: "Firm R&D intensity and employment: Evidence of inverted-U relationship in UK data", jointly organised by GPERC and FEPS. University of Greenwich, Queen Mary Court room QM268, time 17:00-18:00.
  • 28 April 2016: Report launch: Decent Jobs and Wage-led Growth in the UK and Europe, co-organised by GPERC, FEPS and TASC (Ireland), with John McDonnell MP; Professor Ozlem Onaran, Professor Engelbert Stockhammer, Professor James Wickham, Dr Alicja Bobek, Professor Francis Green, Dr Geoff Tily, Dr Ernst Stetter, Mr David Begg.Time: 14:45 - 20:00, University of Greenwich, King William Court, Room KW303. Our press release can be found here.
  • 21 April 2016: Research seminar: Dr Ceyhun Elgin, Bogazici University, "Informality: Measures, Causes and Consequences" jointly organised by GPERC and FEPS. University of Greenwich, Queen Anne Court room QA210. Time: 17:00-19:00.
  • 6 April 2016: GPERC- STIR (sustainability technology and innovation research group): Public launch of the Association for the Study of Innovation, Science and Technology (AsSIST-UK) with Dr Anne-Marie Coles. British Sociological Conference, Aston University, Birmingham, time: 19.00.
  • 9 March - June 2016: PhD lecture series in selected topics in Post-Keynesian, Institutional, Feminist and the Marxian Political Economy, University of Greenwich and Kingston University. Jointly organised by GPERC, FEPS and Kingston University.
  • 9 March 2016: Research seminar: Dr Alberto Botta, "The Theoretical Weaknesses of the Expansionary Austerity Doctrine and its Disastrous Implementation in the Eurozone", Joint International Business and Economics (IBE), GPERC and FEPS research seminar series, at the University of Greenwich, Hamilton House, HH103, Time 16:00 - 17:00.
  • 2 March 2016: Research seminar: Dr Giovanni Cozzi, "Investment-led recovery for Europe: modelling alternatives to austerity", Joint International Business and Economics (IBE), FEPS and GPERC research seminar series, at the University of Greenwich, Queen Ann Court, room QA063, Time 16:00 - 17:00.
  • 10 February 2016: Meta-analysis as a method of evidence synthesis: A workshop, by Mehmet Ugur, University of Greenwich, Queen Anne Court, room QA210, Time 13:30-17:00. Please find here the notes and do files.
  • 20 January 2016: Research seminar: "UK subsidies and private R&D: Is there input additionality?", by Mehmet Ugur, Eshref Trushin and Edna Solomon. Joint International Business and Economics (IBE), FEPS and GPERC research seminar series, at the University of Greenwich Queen Anne Court, room QA063. Time 16:00-17:00.
  • 19 January 2016: GPERC Launch Conference: "Building equitable and sustainable society, four decades of Political Economy at Greenwich", jointly organised by GPERC and FEPS. University of Greenwich, Queen Ann Court, room QA080. Time: 17:00 - 20:30.

2015

  • 5 November 2015: GPERC- STIR (sustainability technology and innovation research group) seminar: "Data into Knowledge", with Eur Ing Dr Deryn Graham on 'Introduction to Big Data and Predictive Analytics' and Dr Anne-Marie Coles on 'Science Fiction Film as a Money-spinner: Innovator as Audience or Audience as Innovator?'
  • 27 October 2015: Report Launch:  Working for the economy: the economic case for trade unions, joint GPERC and New Economic Foundation research project.
  • 4 October 2015: Seminar: Dr Alberto Botta: "The complex inequality-innovation-public investment nexus", University of Greenwich.

For further information on forthcoming events, please contact us.